The oxide-support gold catalysts for water-gas-shift reaction: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy/Spectroscopy Study

Speaker:Prof. Siu-Wai Chan, Columbia University, USA

Time:Jul. 11 2011 PM 2:00

Location:Meeting Room of state key labratory of catalysis Building on Floor 3

 

Brief introduction of Speaker:

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

Nanoparticles in Catalysis, Grain Boundaries, Interfaces, and Defects in Thin Films, and Electronic Oxides

EDUCATION:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1985, Sc.D. in Materials Science and Engineering; Columbia University, 

1980, B.S. in Metallurgy & Materials Sc.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

Full Professor since 2002,

Associate Professor Columbia University, 1990-2002,

90-93 Metallurgy and Mining, 93-98 Chemical Engineering and Materials, 98-present Applied Physics and Applied

 Mathematics.

Executive Committee Member of Materials Research Science & Engineering Center 1998-2009,

Co-chair of Materials Science and Engineering Program and Committee from July 1997 to Jan 1999.

Co-chair of Solid State Program since Jan 2000.

Visiting Professor, Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore 2004

Visiting Professor, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, 2004.

Visiting Professor, Univ. of California San Diego, 2004.

Visiting Scientist, IBM Watson Research Lab., 1999.

Visiting Scientist, Bitter Magnet Lab, 1993-1995.

Member of Technical Staff, Bellcore, Red Bank, NJ, 1986-1990.

Member of technical Staff, Bellcore, Murray Hill, NJ, 1985.

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Member of the American Ceramic Society (Acers)

Strategic Planning Committee 2009-2010,

Chair of the Electronics Division of Acers 2006-2007,

Chair Symposia at Acers Meetings in 2001 to 2008,

Chair Symposia on High Temperature Superconductors at 1998 & 91 Materials Research Society (MRS)

 Fall Meetings;

Chair for various sessions at different MRS and Acers Meetings,

President 1994 & Secretary 1993 of the Materials Science Club; Panelist for National Science Foundation's 

program on Materials

Research Science and Engineering Centers

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES cont

Reviewer on Materials Science Projects for NSF,

Reviewer on Materials Science Projects for Hong Kong University Research Council;

Reviewer for Philosophical Magazine, Applied Physics Letters,

Journal of Applied Physics and Journal of Materials Research.

ASSOCIATIONS

The American Chemical Society (ACS) ;

The American Ceramic Society (Acers) ;

American Physical Society (APS);

International Committee of Diffraction Data (ICDD);

Materials Research Society (MRS);

Society of Women Engineers (SWE);

The Minerals, Metals, Materials Society (TMS)

HONORS & AWARDS

BASF Catalysis Research Award 2008-2011,

Fellow of the American Ceramics Society 2008,

Tan Chin Tuan Fellowship (Singapore Nanyang Technological University) 2004,

Advance Fellow of Univ. of Washington and National Science Foundation 2004,

John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship 2003,

IBM Faculty Award 1998,

Outstanding Woman Scientist Award (Women in Science NY City) 1997,

Presidential Faculty Fellow  from the White House and National Science Foundation (NSF) 1993,

Very Important Parent from Luther Lee Emerson School in Demarest, NJ 1992

DuPont Faculty Award 1991 & 1992,

Tau Beta Pi elected 1979; 

Sigma Xi elected 1982;

Columbia Univ. SEAS Francis B.F. Rhodes Prize 1980.

PUBLICATIONS

106 publications with 69 papers in referred journals.

PRESENTATIONS

Delivered over 85 invited talks.

Abstract:

We start with gold on nano ceria, a water-gas-shift (WSG) catalyst, where the size of ceria crystallites determine

the amount of gold retained as ionic gold and catalyze the WSG reaction. Using a unique synthesis which yields 

highly monodispersed ceria, we found that the crystallite size dictates the amount of Ce3+ in ceria. Each Ce3+ 

on Ce4+lattice site is a point defect and its amount seems to scale with the amount of special sites for ionic gold.

 

In order to understand the interplay between defects in oxide as effective sites for metal modification and WGS

reactions, we study a model catalyst system consisting of supported gold nanoparticles on a reduced Fe3O4 (111) 

surface through a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)/scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) in ultrahigh vacuum. 

Gold forms two electrically distinct nano-particles on an iron oxide surface upon annealing multilayer Au/Fe3O4 (111) 

at 500 ℃ for 15 min. I (V) curves taken via STSmeasurements show that large gold nanoparticles (8 nm) exhibit a 

metallic electronic structure and, thus, are likely neutral. Single gold adatoms appear to be strongly bonded to the 

oxygen sites of the Fe3O4(111) surface, and tunneling electrons areobserved to flow predominantly from the STM 

tip to the Au adatoms and into the oxygen sites of the surface. The site-specific adsorption of the gold adatoms on 

oxygen surface atoms and the size-sensitive nature of the electronic structure suggest that Au adatoms are likely 

positively charged. 、When this Au/Fe3O4(111) system is dosed with CO at 260 K, adsorption of CO molecules 

normal to the surface atop the gold adatom sites takes place. CO adsorption on the large Au nanoparticles(8 nm) 

could not be confirmed by STM. These observations indicate that nonmetallic, positively charged Au species may 

playa key role in reactions involving CO, such as the CO oxidation and the water-gas-shift reaction on Au/metal oxide 

surfaces.

 

J. Phys. Chem. C 2009, 113, 1019810205

Contact: Wenjie Shen

Copyright 2008-2013. Dalian National Laboratory For Clean Energy. All Rights Reserved. 辽ICP备11011481号
网站管理员:徐婷,电话:0411-84379821,邮箱:xuting@dicp.ac.cn